Pace zone charts for running, elevation correction and more

You can choose to show gradient adjusted pace or not and control if GAP or normal pace is used for “time in zones”.

You need to setup pace zones in /settings for Run to get the new stuff. For existing runs you can use the “Update Activities” button in /settings to update them or choose “Update Zones” on the “Actions” menu for the activity. This might take a while if many activities require elevation correction.

Elevation correction uses GPS coordinates and topographical maps to determine elevation (and hence gradient used to calculate gradient adjusted pace). The default setting is “Auto” which uses elevation correction for devices lacking a barometric altimeter. Elevation from devices with only GPS is usually very inaccurate. Data from Strava is not corrected because Strava provides data with very good elevation correction.

Note that the topographic maps are not universal so elevation correction might fail. In particular areas more than 60 degrees North (Scandinavia, Alaska, Iceland etc.) are not covered. I will be adding more maps soon.

The activity settings dialog (click “Actions” under the activity timeline chart) controls elevation correction for individual activities:

Intervals.icu maintains a database of devices with barometric altimeters for the “Auto” setting. If your device is not listed with Yes/No or the information is incorrect please click it and supply the correct information.

The “time in zones” popup for an activity will now use pace zones:

If the activity also has power and/or heart rate then the “Priority” option decides which is used. The default is taken from the “Time in zones” setting for the sport in /settings.

If elevation correction has been enabled for an activity then you can add the “Fixed Alt” chart to see the corrected profile:

Next up: Fix whatever bugs come out of this and get “pace vs time” done (like power duration curve).

10 Likes

Hi David, could you please take a look at this activity? Intervals.icu
It was a pancake flat track run, but average GAP and load seem crazy even if the elevation correction is enabled :thinking:

I can see the problem. The run has some longish stops and those are causing issues with the gradient calc. Will fix now.

Gradient looks so much better now :smiley:. Nice clean-up work!
And indeed, runs with stops have strange average GAP compared to non corrected pace. Time in pace zones looks good.
Thanks for the work!

Can we have GAP as a field for intervals?

Tx. I just added GAP as an interval field, will deploy Sat AM (GMT+2). You will need to re-analyze or “update zones” on activities to see it. Update zones will keep any existing intervals.

I fixed an issue with the gradient calculation that was impacting that activity. The Strava GAP calculation as applied by me is “slowing down” flat stuff somehow. I suggest turning it off for flat runs until I figure out what to do about that …

1 Like

What I am seeing (or think I’m seeing…), is that GAP corrects down for low grade decents in a more aggressive way then it corrects up for ascents with similar grade. Or it is me taking more recovery then I should.

Hmm. You can see that the adjustment isn’t balanced in the Strava post about it.

I should mention that the elevation correction is using www.opentopodata.org running on my own hardware.

Hi David,
Great that you’ve addeed pace for running :slight_smile: Kudos!!!

Would be also possible to make Pace chart similarto this power chart Intervals.icu ?

Yes that is coming soon, tx!

2 Likes

Huh, I don’t see any difference. Here’s another run affected even more: Intervals.icu

On the other hand, a regular run around the city is okay: Intervals.icu