Using different powermeter on road bike and mtb

Maybe there’s already a post about this, I couldn’t find it.

I got a road bike with favero pedal powermeter and want to buy a mountainbike where I’ll use another powermeter. I’m sure some of you already use multiple powermeters on different bikes. How do you cope with the data noise generated by differences between the powermeters?

Not quite the answer you’re after, but I swap my faveros over three various bikes (takes less than a minute - see GPLama’s ‘how to change pedals’ video): saves money and maintains consistency.

I have an outstanding todo item to add gear with an option to adjust FTP based on the bike used (e.g. 95% on TT bike). This will fix load. Could also scale power but might be better to leave as is and then you filter power curves for road or MTB or gear used etc.

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I have a Quarq DZero crankset on my road bike, and a 4iii left crankarm on my gravel bike. The Quarq is extremely close to the numbers from my Kickr (within 2% avg power). My 4iii initially read about 10% high, due to my L/R balance running 55/45 ish. The 4ii app lets you set the ratio by %, so it was just a matter of fiddling on a few trainer rides to get the 4iii so close that the noise doesn’t bother me. I would assume any of the one-sided PM apps woill allow you to alter the L/R %.

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Unless your two powermeter’s readings are way different from each other (and cannot be corrected in the powermeter setup), does it really matter? If the two are a few percentage apart it is unlikely to be relevant to the big picture of your training …

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From all I’ve heard/read Favero pedals aren’t suited for mtb; too fragile

Possible, in that everything that gets repeatedly hit will break eventually!
After three years, my pedals have had quite some abuse, but I am fairly conservative on my MTB - they are fairly scuffed up, though.